Bangalore First a Celebration. Positive News, Facts & Achievements about Bengaluru, Kannadigas and all the People of Karnataka – here at Home and Overseas
  • scissors

    GubbiBF26sept2017

    An inn set up by Gubbi Thotadappa, the legendary philanthropist, continues to host tourists and students

    If any one expects a favour free of charge, ‘Is it a Gubbi Thotadappa Choultry? would be the instant colloquial reaction. Gubbi Thotadappa choultry, close to Bangalore City Railway station and Kempegowda Bus Terminal, is perhaps the oldest non-governmental organisation in the city.

    Bangalore has several free hostels belonging to particular communities, but running a dhramashala — a free choultry (inn) for the visitors or tourists, and continues to do the same even after a century is a remarkable feat.

    This noble act is the brainchild of Gubbi Thotadappa, who was born in 1838 into a Lingayat-Veerashaiva family at Gubbi in Tumakuru dist. Later, his family moved to Bangalore and he started his business in Mamulpet in the city. In his house, he started offering shelter to students who were coming to Bangalore for studies. Similarly, he opened doors to traders coming from faraway places. When this number increased, he decided to use all his property to the benefit of such traders and students. He bought land from Railways in 1897 and built a choultry which had 10 rooms for students to stay. On February 11, 1903, Krishna Raja Wadiyar IV officially opened dharmashala for visitors coming to city and free hostel to students belonging to Lingayat-Veerashaiva Community.

    As he had no children, he donated all his property and founded a trust called Rao Bahadur Gubbi Thotadappa Charity in 1910, and appointed K P Puttanna Chetty as its first president. Since then subsequent office-bearers are carrying out the work as per the wishes of the founder. During Dasara celebration in 1905, he was awarded the title Dharmapravrta, a royal recognition given by the Maharaja of Mysore. In 1910, he was honoured with a title Rao Bahaddur by the British Government. On 21 February, 1910, he died at the age of 72.

    The choultry he built was very helpful then for traders arriving in the city to buy or sell things. Minister for Horticulture Shyamanur Shivashankarappa still remembers the days when he would come here by night train from Davanagere and the choultry was very helpful for people like him to take shelter here for a day or two. Even today, the lodging facility offers accommodation at a nominal rate and it is open to all irrespective of region or religion, caste or creed, position or property. It was 25 paise per day. Over a period of time it was raised to Rs 10 and now it Rs 35. The money collected is spent on maintenance of the choultry. At any given time of the day, at least 50 to 60 visitors stay here. It is much-sought-after shelter to countless number of visitors coming even from other places as its name is spread far and wide. Similarly, the free hostel has been a boon to economically poor students .

    The trust awards scholarships for academic achievers of the community every year. They maintain hostels at 16 different towns in the state. The hostel facility is given for both boys and girls of the students of Lingayat-Veerashaiva community. Revered Dr Shivakumara Mahaswamiji of Siddhaganga Math Tumkuru was a student in this hostel during 1927 to 1930. S Nijalingappa , one of the chief ministers of Karnataka, was an inmate between 1921 and 1924. Likewise, education minister Sri DH Chandrashekaraiah, accountant general Sri DH Veeraiah, Karnataka state police chief H Veerabhadraiah, and many more such illustrious personalities were benefited by this hostel. While unveiling the statue of Gubbi Thotadappa in 2005, Nijalingappa said: “If this noble person had not started the hostel, economically poor students like me would have spent rest of my life working as labourers in cultivating fields”

    In Mamulpet, the old residential building of Gubbi Thotadappa was removed and a shopping complex has been constructed.

    During centenary year, the trust built Bell Hotel as a source of income to spend on all its charitable projects. There is also an aesthetically built conventional hall in this building. Every year on the death anniversary day of the founder, in Mythic Society, on Nrupathunga Road, the trust arranges an endowment lecture from eminent scholars on various subjects.

    Hostel inmates are given training in personality development by experts. The original Dharmashala building still retains its original form. The century-old building represents the tradition of hospitality for which our city is known.

    Whereas the centenary building built with modern architectural style represents modern Bengaluru. There are many lodges in the vicinity of railway station and bus stand. They may have tall buildings, but Gubbi Thotadappa Choultry stands tall as a symbol of humanity.

    (The author is a historian)

    source: http://www.bangaloremirror.indiatimes.com / Bangalore Mirror / Home> Bangalore> Others / by Suresh Moona / Bangalore Mirror Bureau / September 26th, 2017

  • 34

    0
    scissors
    September 26th, 2017adminUncategorized
  • 33

    0
    scissors
    September 26th, 2017adminUncategorized
  • 32

    0
    scissors
    September 26th, 2017adminUncategorized
  • 31

    0
    scissors
    September 26th, 2017adminUncategorized
  • 30

    0
    scissors
    September 26th, 2017adminUncategorized
  • 29

    0
    scissors
    September 26th, 2017adminUncategorized
  • scissors

    New Delhi :

    Union minister of state for civil aviation Jayant Sinha inaugurated Boeing’s additional new facility at the Boeing India Engineering and Technology Center (BIETC) in Bengaluru on Friday. This facility will enable Boeing to focus on state-of-the-art technology areas such as data analytics, internet-of-things, avionics, aerospace design, manufacturing, testing and research, to support Boeing products and systems. The centre also includes laboratories for research to support next-gen innovations in aerospace.

    “Boeing’s commitment to growth of capability and capacity in the Indian aerospace sector is commendable. I congratulate the team on this brand new addition to the Boeing India Engineering and Technology Centre and am proud that Boeing is leveraging India’s engineering talent and its expertise for some of the most advanced aerospace products in the world, and developing complex solutions for the world,” said Jayant Sinha.

    This expansion comes soon after Boeing opened its engineering centre in January 2017. “As a source for innovative and cutting-edge engineering, India offers us tremendous growth potential. This is a winning formula for India and our own global growth strategy for improved productivity, enhanced engineering efficiency and cost advantage, while focusing on quality,” said Pratyush Kumar, president of Boeing India.

    Recently Boeing announced a partnership with aviation ministry and Air India Engineering Services Ltd (AIESL) to develop an aircraft maintenance engineers accelerated apprenticeship program. The key objective of the program is to improve the employability of AMEs through training and hands-on experience with actual aircraft.

    source: http://www.timesofindia.indiatimes.com / The Times of India / News> India News / by Saurabh Sinha / TNN / September 22nd, 2017

  • scissors
    September 21st, 2017adminArts, Culture & Entertainment, Records, All

    Historians say the discovery refers to Alupa ruler Kulashekara and his liegeman

    Rajarajeshwari Temple at Potali

    Rajarajeshwari Temple at Potali

    A 900-year-old inscription was discovered at Polali Rajarajeshwari temple located on the outskirts of Mangaluru.

    It was found during the ongoing renovation works of the temple. Moodabidri-based historian Dr Pundikai Ganapayya Bhat, who examined the inscription, said: “It is a 900-year-old Kannada inscription that was found on the left of the sanctum sanctorum of the temple. It was used as a pedestal for the Nityabhisheka (daily worship) of the idol. It has a mention about Alupa ruler Kulashekara and his liegeman Biliveya Nambi.”

    The inscription, 38 inches tall and 24 inch wide, has 20 lines of writing. Sculptures of two lions and a man along with a lady sitting between these lions are seen on the lower part of the inscription. A few scriptures in between have been damaged. It dates back to 1117 AD. Ganapayya said that the 14th line mentions Pandya Pattiga Deva which could be the title of the ruler — Kulashekara.

    It has a mention of Alvakheda 6000, which means that the region was ruled by the Alupas. Three Veeragallus were also found. Dr B Rajashekarappa, a researcher from Chitradurga, has helped in understanding the inscription. The Alupas are a royal dynasty that ruled Tulunadu from 4th to 15th century. Kulashekaradeva was one of the prominent rulers of Alupa dynasty.

    The Inscription which was found at the temple

    The Inscription which was found at the temple

    A brief history of Alupas

    The Alupa of Tuluva race was a royal dynasty which ruled their native land, Tulunadu, which is now in coastal Karnataka. They independently ruled their kingdom, known as Alvakheda, since the beginning of the common era. Later, with the dominance of Kadambas from Banavasi, they became feudatory to them. With the changing political scenario, soon they became the vassals of the Chalukyas, Rashtrakutas, Hoysalas and Vijayanagara Rayas.

    source: http://www.bangaloremirror.indiatimes.com / Bangalore Mirror / Home> News> State / Bangalore Mirror Bureau / September 20th, 2017

  • scissors
    September 20th, 2017adminArts, Culture & Entertainment, Records, All
    Bengalureans can take rain-affected artwork to the experts at CKP

    Bengalureans can take rain-affected artwork to the experts at CKP

    Experts at Intach-CKP help treat artwork affected by the high humidity in air

    For automobile mechanics, plumbers and doctors, monsoon is a busy time. In the city, however, there is a set of other specialists too, who get busy during this time in particular – working away at rain damage control for pieces of art.

    When there is moisture in the air, fungus crops up in old paintings, murals, heirloom clothes and antique furniture. Art experts at Intach- Chitrakala Parishath Art Conservation Centre (ICKPAC) in Bengaluru are busy this time of the year with conservation and restoration work.

    The centre with a small team of around 10, housed in Chitrakala Parishath premises, has its hands full with rain treatment as a good chunk of Bengalureans are art connoisseurs and possess a variety of heritage and heirloom articles, most of which could have been handed down over generations.

    The little-known centre had earlier handled prestigious restoration projects, including the Velankani Church, Vidhana Soudha paintings and art pieces at Puttaparthi Sai Baba ashram. “Bengaluru’s weather is such that a lot of moisture is in the air during monsoon. This allows growth of fungus in paintings, furniture, clothes and art objects, which need to be treated. Treating is not a permanent solution but we can call it remedial conservation or preventive conservation. We have a team that has specialised in art conservation and we take up such work. It is highly niche work. People come to us with their old paintings, clothes, wooden work, murals and different kinds of art pieces, which we treat for fungus,’’ Madhu Rani, director of Intach Chitrakala Parishath Art Conservation Centre, told Bangalore Mirror.

    The centre has done work not just in the state, but it also takes up work commissioned by other parts of South India. Their earlier work of restoring 300-year-old murals in Thiagarajaswamy temple, Tiruvarur, was a landmark project. These paintings go back to the Nayaka period and are on the ceiling of the thousand-pillared hall in Thiagarajaswami Temple premises. Conservation of mural paintings in Nalaknadu Palace, Kodaganadu, restoration of Mother Mary altar at Velankani church, are also noteworthy. The centre is carrying out restoration of the collections in Puttaparthi Sai Baba ashram — old European paintings gifted by Maharajas of Jamnagar.

    “We are documenting all wall painting sites in Karnataka at palaces, temples or old houses. We have the inventory of such sites and are documenting the status of the paintings,’’ Rani said.

    OPEN FOR ALL

    On Saturday morning, a Parichay will be organised to introduce people to ICKPAC’s works — conservation of paintings, documents, temple murals and oil paintings. This will be led by Madhu Rani and her team. Rani will talk about how you can preserve your great-grandmother’s photograph, or that treasured letter written by your grandfather. Or may be a book that has been handed down generations. The Parichay will be held at Chitrakala Parishath and will be for about two hours. Those interested can mail intach.blr@gmail.com and the event comes with a nominal fee.

    source: http://www.bangaloremirror.indiatimes.com / Bangaloremirror.com / Home> Bangalore> Others / by Kushala Satyanarayana / Bangalore Mirror Bureau / September 20th, 2017

  • « Older Entries